Tag: “strategy series 2015 ”

Can local news compete online?

Posted in:
Industry Trends

An associate professor of economics at Hunter College asks what the benefit is for local news websites when their content is included in aggregators.

Storytelling with a global audience in mind

Posted in:
Industry Trends

Our vice president for U.S. news discusses how the coverage and the promotion of news can change when thinking of international viewership.

The unknowns of mobile advertising

Posted in:
Industry Trends

​A Columbia University business professor says that media organizations are uncomfortable with new advertising technologies because they don’t know what the return on investment will be. But with audiences increasingly on mobile, there’s a huge need to figure it out.​

Paywalls are not the answer for every media organization

Posted in:
Industry Trends

An assistant professor at the Wharton School says paywalls may not be a viable strategy for every newspaper, and questions the survival of media organizations that cannot find alternative revenue sources.

What do changing demographics mean for news consumption?

Posted in:
Industry Trends

An AP director says media organizations need to take note of the growing diversity in the communities they serve.

A generational shift in media audiences and organizations

Posted in:
Industry Trends

An AP senior executive discusses how a change in audiences consuming media requires a shift in mindset for organizations in the industry.

Framing stories with mobile in mind

Posted in:
Industry Trends

Our business editor provides a few questions to think about when writing for audiences on the go.

With content everywhere, the challenge of standing out

Posted in:
Industry Trends

Our global director of mobile products explains the challenges of storytelling in an era of ubiquitous content.​

Going niche, but at what cost?

Posted in:
Industry Trends

​A Columbia University business professor says that media organizations have an incentive to focus more on marginalized topics so they can better retain their audiences, but doing so takes away important voices from democratic issues.